Yalta Agreements

By this time, the Soviet army had fully occupied Poland and held much of Eastern Europe with military power three times greater than that of allied forces in the West. [Citation required] The Declaration of Liberated Europe did little to dispel the sphere of influence agreements that had been included in the ceasefire agreements. The first reaction to the Woalta Agreements was solemn. Roosevelt and many other Americans saw this as proof that the spirit of U.S.-Soviet war cooperation would pass into the post-war period. However, this feeling was short-lived. With the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt on April 12, 1945, Harry S. Truman became the thirty-third President of the United States. At the end of April, the new government clashed with the Soviets over its influence in Eastern Europe and the United Nations. Alarmed by the perceived lack of cooperation on the part of the Soviets, many Americans began to criticize Roosevelt`s handling of the Kanta negotiations. Also present are Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov (far left); Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke, Fleet Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham, ST. AU, RAF Field Marshal Sir Charles Portal, RAF, (behind Churchill); General George C. .

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